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Inflow, a platform for managing ADHD through cognitive behavioral therapy, raises $11M


Inflow, a company developing a platform to manage ADHD using cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) techniques, has raised $11 million in a Series A round of funding.

ADHD, or “attention deficit hyperactivity disorder,” is a condition impacting as much as 10% of the global population. Symptoms vary, but typically involve inattention, hyperactivity, anxiety, and impulsivity.

Founded out of London in 2020 by Levi Epstein, Seb Isaacs, and Dr. George Sachs, Y Combinator (YC) alum Inflow has developed a self-help app designed to help people manage their ADHD through daily exercises and challenges around habit development, ADHD-focused mindfulness techniques, community support, and more.

Inflow app in action

In terms of costs, Inflow offers an initial free 7-day trial which runs into a monthly or annual subscription, the latter costing around $200 per year.

Trials

Inflow was developed “by people with ADHD for people with ADHD,” according to the company, and its founding team includes Dr. George Sachs, a clinical psychologist with more than a decade’s experience treating ADHD in children and adults. Sachs and Co. published a peer-reviewed feasibility and usability study of the app back in August, and plans are currently in place for a broader randomized control trial (RCT) to determine the efficacy of Inflow in terms of outcomes.

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“To ensure the usability and feasibility of the Inflow app, since launching, we have preliminary results through open study testing that members have experienced a decrease in ADHD symptoms and impairment by following Inflow’s approach,” Sachs said in a statement. “It’s encouraging and edifying to see how providing these techniques to those with ADHD, directly and easily through our app, is making a difference to their lives.”

Inflow fits into a broader trend that has seen self-therapy startups flourish, and there are a number of companies out there already focused on addressing different facets of ADHD spanning diagnosis, coaching, and telehealth — including DoneCerebral, Brili, Tiimo, and Elemy. But Inflow cofounder Seb Isaacs is adamant that Inflow stands out from the crowd due to a more all-encompassing approach. Indeed, the company recently expanded into telehealth with the acquisition of Lina Health back in November.

“We’re building a holistic approach for people with ADHD that encompasses all aspects of their care journey, and we are the only company doing this,” he said.

Inflow announced a $2.3 million seed round of funding last January, and with another $11 million in the bank the company said that it plans to double down on product development and bolster its headcount.

“Diagnosing and treating ADHD can be a long and costly process, and living with the symptoms can be extremely challenging,” Isaacs continued. “We want to help our members make significant improvements to their quality of life by giving them the tools to better understand themselves, and implement coping strategies that actually work.”

Inflow’s Series A round was led by Octopus Ventures, with participation from Hoxton Ventures and Route66 Ventures.

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